3imagesWHEN Patrice Wynne shuttered her independent bookstore, Gaia, in Berkeley, Calif., and retired, she knew three things. She wanted to move to a place where she could slow down the tempo of her life, and it was cheaper to live, but where she could continue to work in some fashion.

“I promised myself — I’m not going to slip into going to cocktail parties and playing tennis,” Ms. Wynne, 61, said. “I wanted engagement.”

And that’s what she got. Three years ago, along a cobblestone street in the center of San Miguel de Allende in Mexico, she opened Abrazos, a 650-square-foot retail shop selling colorful Mexican-themed fabric aprons, kitchen and cooking accessories, handbags and clothing, all sewn by a dozen local seamstresses.

Simply retiring abroad has become old news, as people seek cheaper places to live and to slash health care costs while enjoying more temperate climes. But now enjoying a “working retirement,” like Ms. Wynne’s, appears to be gaining traction with expats, as it has in the United States.

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